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Indigenous Activewear Brand Makes Traditional Art Wearable

Who said the old can’t be new again?

What you could be wearing in the next few months is a bold innovation that mixes contemporary sports luxe with Indigenous culture. A kaleidoscope of traditional colour and patterns from the Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander people has inspired the creative genius of Queensland university student and founder of Faebella, Alisha Geary.

Indigenous artwork is beyond dots and dashes, there is an element of storytelling in every piece. The rainbow serpent, the dreamtime, travelling and hunting; each artwork is a tale shared across generations. Geary, born of Aboriginal and Torres Strait heritage, is launching Faebella an activewear brand grounded in the principles of wearing and thus becoming liveable art.

“The artwork is sourced from artists of Indigenous heritage, which gives us the opportunity to share their story along with the story behind their art,” she added.

The idea lay dormant in the mind of Geary until she became a tour guide at university showcasing aboriginal art. The tour displays works from Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander artists and is the largest private collection of Indigenous art in Australia. Growing up she never really had the chance to understand the nature of her background and the living importance it has to both elders and younger generations with Indigenous descent.

“Indigenous art is bold, eye-catching and meaningful…I’m excited to paint some life into this clothing style and inspire people to live with purpose as I have since I’ve founded Faebella said Alisha Geary, creator of Faebella pictured below.

faebella-founder

Geary said the need to preserve the culture of Indigenous art became apparent when she connected with particular designs and thus became involved in the story that it shares.

“The artwork is sourced from artists of Indigenous heritage, which gives us the opportunity to share their story along with the story behind their art,” she added.

The essence behind the design can only be fully understood through the artists and so Geary has set up her Faebella brand to connect with Indigenous artists interested in sharing their story through wearable fitness fashion. Artists submit their designs online giving Alisha an immense palette to choose from when producing her designs.

It has been six months since Geary has set the Faebella project into motion and we’re keen to see where her passion flies. Diving into the $2 billion activewear market is not solely lucrative for Geary, an opportunistic entrepreneur, her business was not born for profitability. For Geary, the joy of seeing vibrant designs on the most practical of fashion pieces supports her clever representation of ancestral history, art and innovation.

As Faebella finds its legs, Geary aims to introduce yoga mats, workout towels and other fitness merchandise and products into her range in the near future. Each design will have a tag that features the story behind the artwork and the artists.

Those interested in joining her mission to free Indigenous art from the walls and onto our clothing can follow Faebella here

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