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The Deadly Indigenous Australians You Should Be Following

Trust me, your Instagram feed could use them.

There’s some serious talent in Australia, especially from Indigenous people – it’s about time that we gave them the attention and credit they deserve.

Honestly, it’s the bare bloody minimum that we can do: to listen to Indigenous voices. And, trust me, you really do have too many white people on your Instagram, anyway. It’ll make you, and it, all the better.

So, to kick you off on you journey to diversifying your media consumption, here are some of our favourite Indigenous people to follow and keep up with on the ‘gram.

A warning to our Aboriginal and Torres Strait readers, the following content may contain images and voices of deceased persons.

Haus of Dizzy (@hausofdizzy)

Fashion. Colour. Political suckerpunches. Look no further than Haus fo Dizzy. The jewellery brand by ‘Queen of Bling’ Kristy Dickenson offers some of the brightest, boldest jewellery you will likely ever see. These eye-catching earings and accessories (stickers, anyone?) have some seriously funky designs and political undertones that’ll keep you woke and in aesthetic heaven.

 

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Catch HOD today at Blak Dot Artists markets!!! I’ll be here till 5pm 🖤💛❤️

A post shared by By Kristy Dickinson 💎 (@hausofdizzy) on

Briggs (@senatorbriggs)

We have to give love to rapper and (self-appointed but, unfortunately, not legit) ‘Senator’ Briggs. Not only is his music an absolute bop, Briggs is a talented comedy writer, actor, and is an all-round legend. Spend five minutes on his Insta (or Twitter), and you’ll go from laughing to saying “oh, shit” many times over – it’s a unique brand of humour that I can’t get enough of.

Australian Indigenous Fashion (@ausindigenousfashion)

A collection of some of the best wearable art from Indigenous designers and brand, created and managed by Dunghutti/Anaiwan woman Yatu Widders-Hunt, this account has curated a space to feature Indigenous designers and creativity. And honestly, there’s so much #fashun. Sustainable materials, intense colour, traditional art with a contemporary flair, we love to see it.

 

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A post shared by Australian Indigenous Fashion (@ausindigenousfashion) on

Brooke Blurton (@brooke.blurton)

Brooke Blurton went from the Bachie mansion straight into our hearts. She has become one of our favourite reality TV stars (and people) ever. This Noongar/Yamatji woman’s feed is chock-full of good vibes and plenty of pride for her culture – from advocating for mental health support, to promoting her NITV gigs, to showing us around her beautiful WA backyard, to fitspo and outfits that are *chefs kiss* – it makes sense why she was nommed to be E’s Australian Social Star of 2020.

 

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🖤💛❤️HAPPY NAIDOC WEEK 🖤💛❤️ stay blak, stay deadly 🤗 #alwayswasalwayswillbe

A post shared by BROOKE BLURTON (@brooke.blurton) on

Baker Boy (@dabakerboy)

Oh yeah, the “Fresh New Prince of Arnhem Land” himself. Not only is he a ripper musician, raps in Yolngu Matha and English, is a mad dancer, but he’s also a great bloke. His music (and Insta, for that matter) encourage Indigenous pride, power, and positive role models, and reminds us of the struggles of Indigenous youth and of trying to Close the Gap.

Nakkiah Lui (@nakkiah)

You might recognise Nakkiah’s name from her tweets calling out yours (and the country’s BS), or her [gorgeous] face from ABC’s Black Comedy, or from her epic appearances on Q&A. Nakkiah is a writer, actor, podcast host, and mind-blowing human. If you aren’t already following her (or, tbh, her podcast co-host, and fellow actor/director/writer friend Miranda Tapsell), you’re missing out on some seriously good content from a serious force of nature.

 

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felt cute, might delete

A post shared by Nakkiah Lui (@nakkiah) on

Meyne Wyatt (@meyneg)

Another force of nature of Meyne Wyatt, who delivered a searing monologue at the end of his appearance on Q&A back in June 2020. He’s an artist on stage, on paper, and on canvas – he took out this year’s Archibald Packing Room Prize (the first Indigenous person to do so, ever) for his self-portrait – and is a seriously inspiring activist and leader for the Indigenous community.

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So I am a finalist and Packing Room Prize Winner for the Archibald @artgalleryofnsw!!! I know I’ve said ‘I don’t want to be quiet. I don’t want to be humble!’ But I am truly humbled by this honour. I’m the First Indigenous Artist to win any prize in the competitions 99 year history but that’s ok our Art and Culture has been celebrated on this land for over 60,000 years!!! Hopefully I ain’t the last and one of us can take home the big one! This one is for my Mum @susancooperwyatt, The Greatest Artist and Mum in the world, for without her I would not be here!!! On this stage and in life! Special Thank you to my darling 😘 @leyareid for your love and support… The message on my face mask is #JusticeForAuntySherry another one of our Mothers, Sisters, Daughters lost last week in Police Custody. #stopaboriginaldeathsincustody #nojusticenopeace ✊🏾🖤💛❤️

A post shared by Meyne Wyatt (@meyneg) on

Clothing the Gap (@clothingthegap)

Aboriginal-owned, Australian operated, this brand not only fits the minimalist aesthetic that we all love, but it’s doing some serious good in trying to Close the Gap. Absolutely 100% of the profits from the sales of their t-shirts, beanies, totes, and Frank Green keep cups go toward supporting Spark Health Australia’s health initiatives in Aboriginal Communities. Give them some love. And maybe even buy a shirt.

Thelma Plum (@thelmaplum)

Another musician who, if you haven’t already listened to yet, you must jump on the bandwagon. Thelma burst onto the Unearthed scene in 2012 and has continued to soar with every new release. Beyond the studio, though, she’s just as brilliant and she’s blazing a trail as an incredible role model and leader in her community (and for a whole generation of women and music fans).

That’s just a taste of the excellence that’s out there. We owe it to ourselves, and especially to the Indigenous community to put in the effort to try and learn as much as we can about this diverse and rich culture – not just this week, but all the time.

Image Sources: Instagram (@meyneg, @nakkiah, @bakerboy, @thelmaplum)

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